Gabrielle Gurley

Gabrielle Gurley is The American Prospect’s deputy editor. Her Twitter is @gurleygg, and her email is ggurley@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Black Alabamians Voted For Themselves

African American men and women turned out in historic numbers to quash the nostalgia for slavery, segregation, and disenfranchisement by terrorism when blacks kept their backs bent and eyes down. 

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images Doug Jones supporters celebrate his victory over Roy Moore at the Sheraton in Birmingham, Alabama W hat motivated African American men and women to vote on Tuesday in Alabama was not the Democratic Party’s plight or the fate of the republic. It wasn’t Cory Booker or Deval Patrick, or Charles Barkley. It was less about Donald Trump. Doug Jones’s role in bringing two Klansmen to justice, convicting them decades after they killed four little girls at a Birmingham house of worship gave him the credibility among black voters that a generic, good-government Democrat would not have had. But it was Roy Moore and his slavery good-times minstrel show that propelled black people to the polls. There were other tangible reasons to make the share of black votes actually higher than when Barack Obama was on the ballot in 2008 and 2012. On most election days, Americans go to the polls, cast their ballots, bid the poll workers bye-bye, and maybe grab a cookie if...

How Maine’s Medicaid Expansion Campaign Got to Yes

Frustration with the status quo and a powerful GOTV campaign helped produce the country’s first Medicaid expansion directly decreed by the voters.

AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty
AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty Activist Susan Johnston helps coordinate the Election Day canvassing effort at the Mainers for Health Care headquarters in Portland I magine that expanding Medicaid coverage to tens of thousands of people somehow meant that hunting and fishing licenses would be more expensive. Fearing a price hike, hunters and fishermen would surely surge to the polls in off-year election to vote no on a Medicaid expansion ballot question. Which is why one of the ads unleashed by opponents of Maine’s Medicaid expansion voter initiative made that very—and very ridiculous—claim. Maine’s Republican Governor, Paul LePage, pugnacious as usual, was the face of the anti-expansion campaign. He took to Maine’s influential talk radio programs to dial up his base, backed by a PAC called Welfare to Work launched by one of his former advisors in August to fight the Medicaid measure. The message? “Able-bodied people” looking “medical welfare” should get off their collective butts and get...

Three Minutes with Planned Parenthood’s Cecile Richards

The women’s reproductive-rights leader shares some thoughts on President Trump and community activism.

(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP)
(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP) Cecile Richards on April 5, 2017 W ith President Trump and the Republican Party determined to bulldoze over decades of women’s health-care gains, reproductive-rights advocates like Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, have been on the front lines of an all-consuming battle to beat back that onslaught. “If we had a majority of people in Congress who could get pregnant, we wouldn’t be fighting about birth control,” she told The American Prospect, underlining one of her signature phrases. “I look forward to that day.” After the 2016 election, Planned Parenthood and Richards (whom The American Prospect featured in a cover story last year) emerged as a kinetic force in the resistance movement. In tandem with dozens of other progressive organizations, Planned Parenthood has spearheaded get-out the-vote drives, town hall meetings on health-care policies, and immigrant-rights and racial-justice marches. The Prospect spoke to Richards before...

Will Harvey Dent Trump’s Climate Change Denial? (Probably Not)

Trump brings his un-presidential touch to the Southeast Texas disaster-in-progress

AP Photo/David J. Phillip
AP Photo/David J. Phillip Evacuees wade down a flooded section of Interstate 610 as floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey rise in Houston. A bsent an 11th-hour conversion, President Donald Trump, who believes that climate change is a Chinese hoax, is unlikely to concede that the warmer waters of the Gulf have played a role in the country’s worst hurricane since Katrina in 2005 and Sandy in 2012. He’s not likely to urge the climate-change deniers he’s placed atop the Environmental Protection Agency to change their tune. And if his climate denial were not enough, his stream-of-deranged-consciousness tweets in the hours as Harvey approached and made landfall continue to demonstrate his total unfitness for the office of presidency. Like New Orleans, Houston has always been a city at risk from hurricanes and tropical storms. Americans will debate for years to come who was responsible for what in the country’s fourth largest city. This much is known: Houston failed to prepare and was bound...

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